West Nile Virus Cases Highest Ever Recorded In U.S.

The recent West Nile virus outbreak is the largest ever seen in the United States, according to new numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The cases reported to the CDC as of Tuesday total 1,118, including 41 deaths. Here are five things you need to know about West Nile virus:

1. Most mosquitoes do not carry West Nile.

In areas where mosquitoes carry the virus, only about one in 500 mosquitoes is infected, according to the Connecticut Mosquito Management Program.

2. Most people bit by West Nile mosquitoes do not get sick.

About 80% of people bit by a mosquito infected with the West Nile virus do not get sick, according to the CDC. About 20% will have relatively mild symptoms, such as fever, headache and vomiting. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days or as long as a few weeks. About one in 150 people infected with West Nile will develop a severe illness, which can include paralysis, coma or death.


3. You can help prevent West Nile with the “four Ds.”

• Use mosquito repellent with DEET

• Dress in long pants and long sleeves

• Be especially careful at dusk and dawn

• Drain any standing water, such as kiddie pools or bird fountains, where mosquitoes like to breed.

4. People over 50 are most vulnerable.

Those older than 50 are the most likely to become severely ill with West Nile and should take special care to avoid mosquitoes, according to the CDC.

5. Seek medical care immediately if you have severe headaches or confusion.

If you develop symptoms of severe West Nile virus illness, such as unusually severe headaches or confusion, seek medical attention immediately, according to the CDC. Severe illness usually requires hospitalization. Milder cases improve on their own and do not necessarily require medical attention.

Have you been infected with the West Nile virus? Tell us how you have battled or prevented this infection from afflicting you and your household!

Source: CNN

Image: The Inquisitr

Avoiding Diabetes? Try Weight Training!

Weight training helps to prevent type 2 diabetes in men, research suggests. Researchers found regular weights reduced the risk by up to a third, in the study of more than 32,000 men published in the Archives of Internal Medicine journal.

It is already well known that regular exercise can prevent the disease. But the is considered important as weights provides an alternative to aerobic exercises such as running for people who are not so mobile.

Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health in the US and the University of Southern Denmark followed the men over an 18-year period, during which time nearly 2,300 developed the condition.


They found 30 minutes of weights a day, five times a week could reduce the risk of diabetes by 34%. But they also reported that even less regular exercise – up to an hour a week – had an impact, cutting the risk by 12%. Nonetheless, aerobic exercise was still found to be slightly better with regular activity halving the risk. The two combined had the greatest effect, reducing it by up to 59%, the study found.

It is not clear if the same results would be found with women.

Are you willing to commit to regular weight training if it means reducing your diabetes risk effectively? Or would you rather opt for some aerobic exercises? Tell us how you maintain a healthy lifestyle!

Source: BBC News

Image: Steady Health