How To Chill A Drink Fast

The heat of the summer is upon us. And I’m sure I’m not the only one asking: What’s the fastest way to chill a drink?

Fridge

Depending on the starting temperature, cooling drinks in the fridge takes anywhere from 45 minutes to 2 hours. Not nearly fast enough when you’re parched.

Freezer

To speed the process, you can wrap a wet paper towel around them and stick them in the freezer. That’s faster — like 20 minutes. And the physics of the wet paper towel is pretty interesting. It works the same way that perspiration cools you down: evaporation draws the heat away from your skin — or away from your drinks. Just don’t let your drinks freeze all the way. But 20 minutes is still too long.


Ice water

Putting your drinks in a bath of ice water chills them even faster than a freezer. Why? Because water conducts heat more easily than air. Compare sitting around in a 68-degree room to sitting around in a 68-degree tub and you’ll quickly see what I mean.

The Solution

I had read that putting salt in the ice water can chill your drinks even faster. Why would this work? Salt water has a lower freezing point than fresh water (which is why salt is often put on roads to prevent icy conditions), and adding salt to a bowl of ice water actually decreases the temperature of the water.

What is your preferred way of chilling your drinks? What is your favorite summer drink? Share your refreshing ideas with us in the comment box below!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Life of a Lil Notty Monkey

Queen Elizabeth Faces Pay Freeze in Austerity Measures

The Queen of England may be forced to scrimp on repairs to her palaces and lavish public appearances under a recently passed British law expected to reduce her income over the next several years.

“The squeeze on the monarch’s income is likely to delay a backlog of repairs to royal palaces,” the Daily Telegraph’s Matthew Holehouse reported Monday. “There will be no extra money from the taxpayer to pay for the court of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who are rapidly emerging as global stars.” (Queen Elizabeth’s son, Charles, Prince of Wales, will continue to kick in to pay the salaries for staff for Prince William and his new bride, the Sunday Times, however, reported.)

Under the new legislation, which passed into law six weeks ago, England will employ a new formula for calculating the Queen’s taxpayer-funded allowance, as Americans might put it. “Under the new arrangement, the Queen receives 15 percent of the profits made over two years from the Crown Estate, whose portfolio includes Regent Street, Windsor Great Park and more than half the country’s shoreline,” Holehouse notes.

“Buckingham Palace is likely to boost its efforts to raise money from commercial sources, or to cut back on public appearances by the royal family,” Holehouse wrote. It’s unlikely, in all events, that the Queen and her immediate circle of relations will pursue the revenue-netting strategies that have won no small amount of notoriety for the commoners who have lately strayed into the Royal Family’s orbit–reality TV contracts, fashion merchandising endorsements, and the like.

Instead, as Holehouse notes, tradition will once again trump the passing travails of the royals: “The sums the Queen will receive will depend on the Crown Estate’s trading performance.”

 

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