Duchess Of Cambridge Gives Birth To Royal Baby Boy!

Duchess Of Cambridge Gives Birth To Royal Baby BoyWith fanfare fit for a prince, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and husband Prince William welcomed their first child Monday. The baby boy was born at 4:24 p.m., weighing 8 pounds, 6 ounces. A name has not yet been announced for the child, who is third in line to the throne.

‘Could not be happier’

People from all over the world had gathered outside Buckingham Palace to await news of the birth. At least one group of well-wishers brought flowers, champagne and a card for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. The fountains at Trafalgar Square were turned blue.

The new parents spent some time with their baby before calling family members — starting with Queen Elizabeth II — to announce the birth, a Kensington Palace source told CNN royal correspondent Max Foster. Prince William remained at Catherine’s side throughout the labor and the baby was born vaginally, not via a C-section, the source said.

“We could not be happier,” said Prince William, according to the Kensington Palace source.


‘Third in line’

Earlier Monday, the duchess and Prince William traveled by car from Kensington Palace to the Lindo Wing at St. Mary’s Hospital. The hospital, next to Paddington Station in London, is where William and his brother Prince Harry were born. The baby’s name may be announced when the family leaves the hospital, CNN’s Foster reported.

The child’s title will be His Royal Highness Prince (the baby’s name) of Cambridge. The baby is third in line for the throne now occupied by the queen. Her son, Charles, will succeed her, followed by his son, William.

What do you think will be the name of the new royal baby? Feel free to contribute your ideas via the comment box below!

Source: Dana Ford. Laura Smith-Spark and Richard Allen Greene | CNN

Image: NY Mag

Gulf War U.S. Commander Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf Dies At 78

Gulf War U.S. Commander Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf Dies At 78Truth is, retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf didn’t care much for his popular “Stormin’ Norman” nickname.

‘The Bear’

The seemingly no-nonsense Desert Storm commander’s reputed temper with aides and subordinates supposedly earned him that rough-and-ready moniker. But others around the general, who died Thursday in Tampa, Fla., at age 78 from complications from pneumonia, knew him as a friendly, talkative and even jovial figure who preferred the somewhat milder sobriquet given by his troops: “The Bear.”

Schwarzkopf capped an illustrious military career by commanding the U.S.-led international coalition that drove Saddam Hussein’s forces out of Kuwait in 1991 — but he’d managed to keep a low profile in the public debate over the second Gulf War against Iraq, saying at one point that he doubted victory would be as easy as the White House and the Pentagon predicted.


‘It Doesn’t Take A Hero’

At the peak of his postwar national celebrity, Schwarzkopf — a self-proclaimed political independent — rejected suggestions that he run for office, and remained far more private than other generals, although he did serve briefly as a military commentator for NBC.

After retiring from the Army in 1992, Schwarzkopf wrote a best-selling autobiography, “It Doesn’t Take A Hero.” Of his Gulf War role, he said: “I like to say I’m not a hero. I was lucky enough to lead a very successful war.” He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and honored with decorations from France, Britain, Belgium, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain.

“I may have made my reputation as a general in the Army and I’m very proud of that,” he once told The Associated Press. “But I’ve always felt that I was more than one-dimensional. I’d like to think I’m a caring human being. … It’s nice to feel that you have a purpose.”

Did you admire Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf for his accomplishments in the military department? For you, what does it take to become a hero?

Source: Associated Press, Fox News

Image: NY Daily News