How To Cook French Fries Ala McDonald’s

Even food snobs who shun McDonald’s have to admit that they serve the mother of all French fries. David Myers, chef/owner of Comme Ca in Los Angeles and Las Vegas, says the key to making a perfect, consistent, McDonald’s-style fry is in the advance preparation.

The cut potatoes need to be soaked for at least two hours before cooking which pulls out excess starch and ensures the crispiest product. Also, Myers recommends that, “you have plenty of paper towels, a lined sheet pan, and have your oil ready to go.” The beauty of Myers’ two-step cooking method is that you can cook your fries ahead of a dinner party and keep them in the fridge until you are ready to finish in hot oil just before serving. This way you get the most delicious, sizzling, salty, golden-brown fries every time.

Perfect French Fries (adapted from David Myers’s recipe for “pommes frites”)

Ingredients:

    • 6 Idaho russet potatoes
    • Peanut oil
    • Sea salt (Myers prefers Sel Gris, a fine light grey French salt)


Method:

Peel and square off potato ends. Cut into 3/8″ batons. Soak for two hours changing water after an hour. Dry thoroughly with paper towels. Heat about an inch of oil (or enough to cover potatoes) in a large, heavy bottomed pot to 290 degrees. Blanch potatoes gently for about two minutes until cooked through but still completely pale. Place on a paper-towel lined sheet pan and cool in the refrigerator to stop cooking process.

Re-heat oil to 370 degrees. Cook fries until golden and crispy, about 3 to 4 minutes. If necessary, agitate gently with a spatula to prevent sticking. Remove from pan and toss with salt to taste (Myers doesn’t blot but you can if you want less fat). Serve immediately. Recipe serves 4 to 6.

Do you agree that McDonald’s has the best fries ever? Tell us what you think!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Open Rice

Foods That Should Be Kept Out of the Fridge

And as it turns out, the refrigerator is not the go-to storage unit for all your produce. Below are 5 types of produce you shouldn’t keep in your fridge.

Tomatoes: The fridge is not the ideal place to store tomatoes. Store them there and your perfect tomatoes turn into a mealy disappointment. They’ll still be good for cooking, but not the best for eating fresh. Instead store them on your counter (not in direct sunlight) and enjoy them when they’re ripe.

Basil: Extended periods of time in a cold environment like a refrigerator causes it to wilt prematurely. Basil will do best if it’s stored on your counter and treated as you would fresh cut-flowers.

Potatoes: They do best at around 45 degrees F, which is about 10 degrees warmer than the average refrigerator. Most of us don’t have a root cellar, so keeping them in a paper bag in a coolish spot (like a pantry) is best. Storing potatoes at cold temperatures converts their starch to sugar more quickly, which can affect the flavor, texture and the way they cook.


Onions: Onions don’t come out of the ground with that protective papery skin. To develop and keep that dry outer layer, they need to be “cured” and kept in a dry environment like a pantry, which is not as damp as the refrigerator. Store onions in a cool, dry, dark, well-ventilated place. (Light can cause the onions to become bitter.)

Avocados: Avocados don’t start to ripen until after they’re picked from the tree. The bottom line on storing avocados is store hard, unripe avocados on your counter and store ripe avocados in your refrigerator if you’re not going to eat them right away.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Summer Tomato