John Kerry: U.S. Will Support U.N. Arms Regulation Treaty

John Kerry U.S. Will Support U.N. Arms Regulation TreatySecretary of State John Kerry said Monday that the Obama administration would sign a controversial U.N. treaty on arms regulation, despite bipartisan resistance in Congress from members concerned it could lead to new gun control measures in the U.S.

‘Regulate arms brokers’

Kerry, releasing a written statement as the U.N. treaty opened for signature Monday, said the U.S. “welcomes” the next phase for the treaty, which the U.N. General Assembly approved on April 2.

The treaty would require countries that ratify it to establish national regulations to control the transfer of conventional arms and components and to regulate arms brokers, but it will not explicitly control the domestic use of weapons in any country.


‘Global importance’

Still, gun-rights supporters on Capitol Hill warn the treaty could be used as the basis for additional gun regulations inside the U.S. and have threatened not to ratify.  Last week, 130 members of Congress signed a letter to Obama and Kerry urging them to reject the measure for this and other reasons.

The United Nations has organized a high-level signing ceremony at U.N. headquarters on Monday — a sign of the treaty’s global importance — and several dozen countries are expected to sign, the first step to ratification.

Many violence-wracked countries, including Congo and South Sudan, are also expected to sign. The coalition said their signature — and ratification — will make it more difficult for illicit arms to cross borders. The treaty covers battle tanks, armored combat vehicles, large-caliber artillery systems, combat aircraft, attack helicopters, warships, missiles and missile launchers, and small arms and light weapons.

Are you in favor of the U.N. arms regulation treaty? Why or why not?

Source: Fox News

Image: Yahoo News

Hillary Clinton Testifies At Benghazi Hearing

Hillary Clinton Testifies At Benghazi HearingIn one of her last acts as America’s top diplomat, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hit back hard Wednesday at fierce Republican criticisms over the deadly Sept. 11, 2012, terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya.

‘Death trap’

“You let the consulate become a death trap, and that’s national security malpractice,” Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-S.C., said during the afternoon House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing. He asked Clinton to define what taking responsibility for the attack means to her.

“I think I’ve made that very clear, congressman,” Clinton responded testily.

Her voice broke as she recalled welcoming home the “flag-draped caskets” of U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three other Americans killed in the terrorist strike at the compound, and putting her arms around bereaved family members. And she hit the witness table with her fist several times during a contentious exchange with Republican Sen. Ron Johnson, who accused President Barack Obama’s administration of misleading Americans by initially saying the attack grew out of a protest against an Internet video mocking Islam. There was no such demonstration, as officials later acknowledged.


‘Chilling comments’

“With all due respect, the fact is we had four dead Americans. Was it because of a protest? Or was it because of guys out for a walk one night who decided they’d go kill some Americans? What difference, at this point, does it make,” Clinton scolded Johnson, raising her voice. “It is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, Senator.”

Among Clinton’s more notable—and chilling—other comments: Islamist fighters around the region are now equipped with heavy weapons seized from unsecured Libyan arsenals after the fall of strongman Moammar Gadhafi. Critics of the NATO-led campaign to help rebels topple him had warned of the prospect that his arsenals would fall into extremist hands.

Are you satisfied with Hillary Clinton’s recent testimonies regarding the Benghazi attack? Share your thoughts with us!

Source: Olivier Knox, Yahoo News

Image: The Christian Science Monitor