Photographer Ripped For ‘Shoddy’ Olympic Photos

A set of portraits of American Olympians has generated negative feelings in the photography community because of an “amateur” and “shoddy” look that some think was intentional.

The photos were taken for Getty and AFP at the USOC media summit by Joe Klamar. While other photographers at the event chose to shoot the portraits straight up, Klamar’s had a different feel. Members of the photography community weren’t going for it. While the photos were taken in May, they’ve only recently gained a notorious reputation thanks to a thread on reddit’s photography page. Here’s a typical comment on reddit’s photography page:

“wow… he’s trying something new for press shots, concealing some details in shadows… using FOV and perspective to distort subjects in a not-so appealing way… Oh wait, these haven’t been processed… Wow they’re getting worse… Ok this wasn’t on purpose…these are terrible…”


You know when you’re watching a basketball game and the director cuts to a floor-level camera from behind the basket and you’re thinking, “huh, this is neat” for about two seconds before realizing that you can’t see anything? There’s a reason that camera has been positioned halfway up the stadium at half court for a reason. It looks good for a reason. That’s sort of my thought on Klamar’s photos. He tried to do something different and it didn’t work. (Making Natalie Coughlin look anything but beautiful, for instance, was a big miss.)

That’s my uninformed opinion. Some folks in the photography field were a bit more harsh: “This is an embarrassment to our country and my profession,” one wrote.

How about you, what is your take on Joe Klamar’s Olympic portraits? Does his new form of “art” gain a Like or a Gripe?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Tumblr

Colorblind Man Can Hear Color

Artist Neil Harbisson is completely colour-blind. Here, he explains how a camera attached to his head allows him to hear colour.

Until I was 11, I didn’t know I could only see in shades of grey. I thought I could see colours but that I was confusing them. When I was diagnosed with achromatopsia [a rare vision disorder], it was a bit of a shock but at least we knew what was wrong. Doctors said it was impossible to cure.

When I was 16, I decided to study art. I told my tutor I could only see in black and white, and his first reaction was, “What the hell are you doing here then?” I told him I really wanted to understand what colour was. At university I went to a cybernetics lecture by Adam Montandon, a student from Plymouth University, and asked if we could create something so I could see colour. He came up with a simple device, made up of a webcam, a computer and a pair of headphones and created software that would translate any colour in front of me into a sound.


It has changed the way I perceive art. Now I have created a completely new world where colour and sound are exactly the same thing. I like doing sound portraits – I get close to someone’s face, I take down the sound of the hair, the sounds of the skin, eyes and lips, and then I create a specific chord that relates to the face.

There is no end to the evolution of this electronic eye.

Source: BBC News

Image: Gadget Buzz