To Weed Or Not To Weed?

To Weed Or Not To WeedTo weed or not to weed? That is the million-dollar-question for this decade.

‘Legalization’

In the United States, the status of marijuana has been debated over so many times. Should it be legalized nationwide or not? Is it a threat to public safety? Will it affect tax revenue greatly? On an on, the weed discussion goes on.

Lately, a lot of people have been changing their perspective on the use of marijuana. Before, most viewed marijuana as just another drug that should be outlawed. Now, more and more people are seeing the positive side of medical marijuana. Moreover, more and more people are supporting the legalization of marijuana.


‘Black and white’

Maybe the increased awareness about medical marijuana has opened the eyes of other people to its positive uses and removed some of the stigma associated with this drug. Or maybe Washington and Colorado’s move to legalize it for recreational use has pushed other states to try to do the same, too. And now, the laws are more lenient toward possession and usage of the popular weed.

Before, there was only black and white in the view about marijuana. People saw it only as either good or evil. Now, we are already exploring the “why” and the “how much” of that view. And now, we are looking at a picture of pot potentially moving to the spot that alcohol now occupies. Do you think that’s possible?

To weed or not to weed — that is still the question that up until now, we still do not have clear answers to.

What is your opinion regarding the legalization of marijuana? Are you in favor of the use of medical marijuana?

Image: Knight Science Journalism

Non-Muslim Women Try The Hijab For A Day

Non-Muslim Women Try The Hijab For A DayWorld Hijab Day calls on non-Muslim women to try out life under the traditional head scarf. Can it lead to more religious tolerance and understanding?

‘Oppression and divisiveness’

Originated by New York woman Nazma Khan, the movement has been organised almost solely over social networking sites. It has attracted interest from Muslims and non-Muslims in more than 50 countries across the world.

For many people, the hijab is a symbol of oppression and divisiveness. It’s a visible target that often bears the brunt of a larger debate about Islam in the West. World Hijab Day is designed to counteract these controversies. It encourages non-Muslim women (or even Muslim women who do not ordinarily wear one) to don the hijab and experience what it’s like to do so, as part of a bid to foster better understanding.


‘Choose the hijab willingly’

Esther Dale, 28, lives in the US state of California and is another non-Muslim trying out the headscarf for the day. The mother-of-three was told about the event by a friend of hers who is a “hijabi”. As a practising Mormon, Dale understands the importance of faith in daily life, and the judgement that can come with the associated clothing. She says she knows the stigma that surround the headscarf and hopes this is an opportunity to help combat that.

The hijab has been a frequent target of criticism from people like Maryam Namazie, a vocal ex-Muslim and campaigner, who sees the garment as a form of oppression. Organisers of this event say they were fed up with seeing the words “oppressed” or “subjugated” when it came to discussing the Muslim head-covering. They reject the notion that women only wear hijabs at the insistence of a father or a radical member of the family. This day, then, is about showing the world that women can choose the hijab willingly.

What are your views regarding modesty and women’s clothing? Are you willing to participate in the World Hijab Day to combat the misconceptions and stigma surrounding the hijab?

Source: Catrin Nye, BBC News

Image: Muslim Matters