Student ‘Forgotten’ In DEA Cell Receives $4.1M Settlement

Student 'Forgotten' In DEA Cell Receives $4.1M SettlementA University of California San Diego student left unmonitored in a holding cell for five days by the Drug Enforcement Administration has settled a lawsuit for $4.1 million, his attorney said.

‘No one responded’

Daniel Chong, 25, drank his own urine to survive and even wrote a farewell note to his mother before authorities discovered him severely dehydrated after a 2012 drug raid in San Diego. He was held in a 5-by-10-foot cell with no windows but a peephole through the door. There was no toilet, only a metal bench on which he stood in a futile attempt to set off the sprinkler system with his cuffed hands, Chongtold CNN affiliate KSWB. He kicked the door and yelled, anything to get someone’s attention, the station reported.

One matter still unclear is why no one heard him. Chong told the San Diego Union-Tribune last year that he heard footsteps, muffled voices and the opening and closing of cell doors, even from the cell adjacent to his. Yet no one responded to the ruckus coming from inside his cell.


‘Sorry Mom’

Chong was detained on the morning of April 21, 2012, when DEA agents raided a house they suspected was being used to distribute MDMA, commonly known as “ecstasy.” Upon his release, Mr. Chong told CNN affiliate KNSD that he was visiting a friend and knew nothing about the presence of drugs and guns. He was never formally arrested or charged, the DEA said.

While detained, Chong had given up and accepted death, using a shard of glass from his glasses to carve “Sorry Mom” onto his arm as a farewell message, Yoo said. Chong lost 15 pounds and suffered from severe post-traumatic stress disorder, she said. Since the incident, Chong has returned to complete his undergraduate degree at UC San Diego.

Why do you think Daniel Chong was left unmonitored for five days in that holding cell? Do you think the $4.1 million settlement is enough to compensate for that?

Source: Stan Wilson | CNN

Image: Telegraph

Texas College Knife Attack Suspect Fantasized About Crime

Texas College Knife Attack Suspect Fantasized About CrimeThe 20-year-old student accused in a stabbing rampage at a Texas college campus told investigators he had fantasies of killing people and had planned the attack, sheriff’s officials said late Tuesday.

‘Fantasies of stabbing people to death’

Dylan Quick, 20, was charged with three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after the stabbings, said Donna Hawkins, an official with the Harris County Prosecutor’s Office.

“According to the statement the suspect voluntarily gave investigators, he has had fantasies of stabbing people to death since he was in elementary school,” a statement from the Harris County Sheriff’s Office said. “He also indicated that he has been planning this incident for some time.”

Quick used “a razor-type knife” to stab victims at the Lone Star College’s CyFair campus Tuesday, the sheriff office’s statement said. Fourteen people were injured in the attack, officials said. Two of them remained hospitalized in critical condition late Tuesday, said Kathryn Klein, a spokeswoman for the Memorial Hermann Texas Trauma Institute.


‘Lockdown’

Witnesses of the attack at the campus northwest of Houston described a chaotic scene. Bleeding victims collapsed to the ground. Many students and teachers ran for cover. Some sprang into action, chasing after the suspect and helping the wounded.

Most of the victims had lacerations in their head and neck areas, said Robert Rasa, a spokesman for the CyFair Volunteer Fire Department. The school was on lockdown Tuesday afternoon while authorities combed the campus to ensure no other injured people or attackers were there, Harris County sheriff’s spokesman Alan Bernstein said.

The school posted a warning on its website: “Stay away from the area. Seek shelter in a secure location until the incident is resolved.”

What do you think is the biggest contributing factor to the rising violence among young people these days? Are parents to blame?

Source: Catherine E. Shoichet and Joe Sutton, CNN

Image: The Washington Post