Sweet Sodas Linked To Depression

Sweet Sodas Linked To DepressionWe know that sugary sodas aren’t good for our bodies; now it turns out that they may not be good for our minds, either. A new study of more than 260,000 people has found a link between sweetened soft-drinks and depression – and diet sodas may be making matters worse.

The study, which was released on Tuesday and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in March, involved 263,925 people between the ages of 50 and 71. Researchers tracked their consumption of beverages like soda, tea, coffee, and other soft drinks from 1995 to 1996 and then, 10 years later, asked them if they had been diagnosed with depression since the year 2000. More than 11,300 of them had.

Participants who drank more than four servings of soda per day were 30 percent more likely to develop depression than participants who did not drink soda at all. People who stuck with fruit punch had a 38 percent higher risk than people who didn’t drink sweetened drinks. And all that extra sugar isn’t the actual problem: The research showed that low-calorie diet sodas, iced teas, and fruit punches were linked to an slightly higher risk of depression than the high-calorie stuff. Researchers say that the artificial sweetener aspartame may be to blame.


But there’s a bright side for those who can’t do without the caffeinated jolt of their daily sodas. Adults who drank coffee had a 10 percent lower risk of depression compared to people who didn’t drink any coffee, according to the study. That reinforces findings from a 2011 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, which said that women who drink fully caffeinated coffee have a lower risk of depression than non-coffee drinkers. Dr. Honglei Chen, an investigator at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, cautions that, if you’ve been diagnosed with depression, cutting your soda intake isn’t necessarily going to help.

“More research is needed to confirm these findings,” Chen said, “and people with depression should continue to take depression medications prescribed by their doctors.”

How much soda do you consume daily or weekly? Do you plan to cut down on your soda habits?

Source: Lylah M. Alphonse, Yahoo Shine

Image: News Whip

Study Finds Babies In Dog-Owning Homes Are Healthier

Dogs are no longer just man’s best friend: The furry family members may also protect infants against breathing problems and infections, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that Finnish babies who lived with a dog or – to a lesser extent – a cat spent fewer weeks with ear infections, coughs or running noses. They were also less likely to need antibiotics than infants in pet-free homes. Dr. Eija Bergroth from Kuopio University Hospital in Finland and colleagues said one possible explanation for that finding is that dirt and allergens brought in by animals are good for babies’ immune systems.


The researchers found that contact with dogs, more than cats, was tied to fewer weeks of sickness for babies. For example, infants with no dog contact at home were healthy for 65 percent of parents’ weekly diary reports. That compared to between 72 and 76 percent for those who had a dog at home. Babies in dog-owning families were also 44 percent less likely to get inner ear infections and 29 percent less likely to need antibiotics.

The researchers said infants who spent more than zero but less than six hours per day at home with a dog were the least likely to get sick. “A possible explanation for this interesting finding might be that the amount of dirt brought inside the home by dogs could be higher in these families because (the dog) spent more time outdoors,” the researchers wrote Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

Do you have dogs at home? Do you agree with the result of this study that babies who live with dog-owning are healthier than those who don’t? Share your thoughts with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: She Knows