Record-Breaking Two-Mile Bridal Train Displayed In Rome

If a bride really wants to turn heads, nothing could possibly top wearing Gianni Molaro’s latest wedding gown. The Italian designer’s silk and tulle dress features a train that’s nearly two miles long!

The record-breaking style was displayed this week cascading down the steps of the Trinita dei Monti Renaissance church in Rome, Italy, to celebrate the opening of Molaro’s new design studio. According to the Daily Mail, the sheer gauzy train, made of 1.86 miles of tulle and six miles of silk , was worn by Elena De Angelis last September for her wedding to Ferdinand Pucci in Casal di Princice in Naples.


It took dozens of seamstresses months to create, and required 600 volunteers to keep it off the ground as De Angelis drove to the church in a vintage car. We imagine that was quite a sight for her 20,000 guests and thousands of onlookers. This bridal train now ties for the world’s longest–Andree Salon, a Bucharest fashion label, debuted an equally long style flowing down from a hot air balloon earlier this year.

“I was really grateful to be asked to design this veil,” Molaro told the Sun last year. “I met tens of thousands of people on the way to the church who complimented my idea. I wanted this veil to symbolize peace and hope and I think we have achieved this. This has been one of the biggest moments in my career as a designer.” We believe it was also one of the longest moments.

On your wedding day, would you want to wear a bridal train this long? Tell us if you think Molaro’s designs are hip or not!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Daily Mail

Annular Eclipse Coming Up This Weekend

We Earthlings have already been treated to nice meteor showers as well as a magnificent supermoon, and this weekend brings an annular solar eclipse.

That’s not even the best treat: Venus will be ambling between Earth and the sun in a rare (though non-earth-shattering) planetary alignment. Sure, the event might look like a black pimple floating across the face of the sun, but this celestial rarity once guided adventurous astronomers in their quest to determine the size of the solar system and yielded the first-ever global scientific collaboration. Don’t blink—Venus doesn’t cross our path again until December 2117.


A solar eclipse happens this Sunday, except for the Eastern seaboard (sorry). It’s an “annular” eclipse rather than a total one, which means the sun’s edges peek out from behind the moon, creating the illusion of a ring of fire. (The word “annular” comes from the Latin word for ring.) The lower 48 states will have to wait until Aug. 17, 2017, for a total shutout. This weekend’s eclipse

begins at dawn in southern China. It then sweeps across the Pacific Ocean, passing south of Alaska, and makes landfall on the Pacific coast near the California-Oregon border. It ends near Lubbock, Texas, at sunset. Partial phases of this eclipse will be visible over most of western North America. (May 9, Space.com)

Those of you in the annular path should head to higher ground (avoiding clouds and light pollution) and put solar filters either over your eyes or on your equipment. Thirty-three national parks will be hosting solar gatherings. Lucky Coloradans get to hang out for free at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Folsom stadium, starting 5:30 p.m. local time, thanks to the Fiske Planetarium.

Designer sunglasses don’t cut it. At this late date, check telescope stores or call your local planetarium. No. 14 welder’s glass, carried in specialty welding stores, works too.

Will you be watching for the annular eclipse this weekend? Tell us of your previous sightings!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: ABC News