70-Year-Old Virgin: ‘I’m Ready To Take The Plunge’

The 2005 film “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” grossed nearly $200 million worldwide based on the premise of a man who went without sex into midlife. But one real-life woman has managed to stay a virgin up to her 70th birthday. That could be about to change. 

“Now’s the time. I’m ready to take the plunge for the right bloke,” Pam Shaw tells the Sun.”My standards are still very high, though. I’m hoping to bag a tall, dark and handsome millionaire.”

Shaw says she doesn’t believe in sex before marriage and has been too busy with her career as a cabaret dancer to settle down. “I feel I am ready to give marriage a go and maybe go to bed with a man,” she said. “You are never too old for anything. Just look at Joan Collins.”


The paper notes that despite her voluntary lifelong abstinence, Shaw goes by the stage name “The Sexational Pam,” and once fraternized with male sex symbols like “It’s Not Unusual” singer Tom Jones and James Bond actor Roger Moore. Shaw says she lived with her mother until she passed away at the age of 97 in 1995. Ironically, Shaw says men have often made incorrect assumptions about her sex life, or lack thereof, because of her career in the entertainment industry.

“I’ve never really been intimate with a man, just a bit of kissing. I had a sexy stage name and dressed sexy but that was all for my career,” she said.

Do you agree that it is a person can never be too old for anything? Tell us what you think!

Source & Image: Yahoo News

Starbucks Using Crushed Bugs in Strawberry Frappuccino?

You can get your Starbucks Strawberry Frappuccino venti, grande or tall. You just can’t get it without insects, to which it owes its pink and rosy color.

In what the company, in a statement, says was a move intended to reduce its use of artificial ingredients, Starbucks has started using cochineal extract to supply its Frappuccinos’ strawberry hue. Cochineal extract is derived from grinding up insects, the dried bodies of cochineal bugs, found primarily in Mexico and South America. Cochineal dye has been used as a coloring agent since the 15th century.

Before you get all cold-and-bothered about your insect-Frappuccino, be advised: Cochineal is considered safe by the FDA, and is widely used for coloration in jams, preserves, meat, marinades, alcoholic drinks, bakery products, cookies, cheddar cheese and many other food products. It has been found by the World Health Organization, however, to cause asthma in some people, and in some others an allergic reaction.


Starbucks’ statement, issued partly in response to vegans’ asking if the use of this ingredient makes Strawberry Frappuccino vegan or not, reads in full:

“At Starbucks, we strive to carry products that meet a variety of dietary lifestyles and needs. We also have the goal to minimize artificial ingredients in our products. While the strawberry base isn’t a vegan product, it helps us move away from artificial dyes. Many Starbucks ingredients can be combined to create a beverage free from animal-derived products; however, we are unable to guarantee this due to the potential cross-contamination with other animal-derived products in our retail locations.”

A vegetarian website, ThisDishIsVegetarian.com, brands the strawberry insecto-Frapp non-vegan.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Soda Head