5 Facts About High School That We Don’t Realize Until Too Late

Maybe kids today are already wise enough to see these things, but back when I was in school, it would have been nice to know that …

#5. The Things That Make You Cool Now Mean Nothing After Graduation. It’s a sort of social hierarchy that’s built around a person’s activities, looks, fashion sense and taste in entertainment, a power structure that seems to mean everything for a few years and immediately evaporates within days of graduation.

#4. Not Every Teacher Knows What They’re Teaching. When you’re a kid, you don’t realize that your teachers aren’t necessarily any wiser than the average person, and may in fact be undergoing medication for numerous mental illnesses.


#3. No One Gives a Crap About Your Crusades. Remember, most of what matters in here probably doesn’t matter out there. It’s a bubble where all of the priorities are upside-down — the contest for Prom King is huge, the kid getting terrorized by bullies means nothing.

#2. Pep Rallies Are Commercials. They’re not trying to get the team pumped up. They’re trying to get you pumped up, because the games need to make money.

#1. Nobody Has Any Clue What They’re Talking About. Everybody has an opinion, and never in my life have I heard people so eager to express those opinions than when I was in high school. Eventually, you find that the opinions you used to have weren’t actually your opinions at all, but rather a soupy puddle of other people’s regurgitated ideas that sounded cool at the time. It’s part of growing up.

A few years after graduation, it’ll all make sense. Maybe you can pass this article along to your own teenage relatives and watch them roll their eyes. Then you can sit back and watch the cycle start all over again with them.

Source: Digg

Image: Bi-lingual

What Babies Learn in the Womb

When does learning begin? As I explain in the talk I gave at TED, learning starts much earlier than many of us would have imagined: in the womb.

Much of what a pregnant woman encounters in her daily life — the air she breathes, the food and drink she consumes, the chemicals she’s exposed to, even the emotions she feels — are shared in some fashion with her fetus. They make up a mix of influences as individual and idiosyncratic as the woman herself. The fetus treats these maternal contributions as information, as what I like to call biological postcards from the world outside.

By attending to such messages, the fetus learns the answers to questions critical to its survival: Will it be born into a world of abundance, or scarcity? Will it be safe and protected, or will it face constant dangers and threats? Will it live a long, fruitful life, or a short, harried one?

This crucial period has become a promising new target for prevention, raising hopes of conquering public health scourges like obesity and heart disease by intervening before birth. By “teaching” fetuses the appropriate lessons while they’re still in utero, we could potentially end vicious cycles of poverty, infirmity and illness and initiate virtuous cycles of health, strength and stability.

When we hold our babies for the first time, we imagine them clean and new, unmarked by life, when in fact they have already been shaped by the world, and by us. It’s my privilege to share with the TED audience the good news about how we can teach our children well from the very beginning.

 

Source: CNN.com