Supreme Court Strikes Down Law Requiring Citizenship Proof For Voters

Supreme Court Strikes Down Law Requiring Citizenship Proof For VotersThe Supreme Court ruled Monday that states cannot on their own require would-be voters to prove they are U.S. citizens before using a federal registration system designed to make signing up easier.

‘Motor Voter’

The justices voted 7-2 to throw out Arizona’s voter-approved requirement that prospective voters document their U.S. citizenship in order to use a registration form produced under the federal “Motor Voter” voter registration law. Federal law “precludes Arizona from requiring a federal form applicant to submit information beyond that required by the form itself,” Justice Antonia Scalia wrote for the court’s majority.

The court was considering the legality of Arizona’s requirement that prospective voters document their U.S. citizenship in order to use a registration form produced under the federal “motor voter” registration law. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said that the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which doesn’t require such documentation, trumps Arizona’s Proposition 200 passed in 2004.


‘Burdensome paperwork’

Arizona appealed that decision to the Supreme Court.

“Today’s decision sends a strong message that states cannot block their citizens from registering to vote by superimposing burdensome paperwork requirements on top of federal law,” said Nina Perales, vice president of litigation for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and lead counsel for the voters who challenged Proposition 200. “The Supreme Court has affirmed that all U.S. citizens have the right to register to vote using the national postcard, regardless of the state in which they live,” she said.

The case focuses on Arizona, which has tangled frequently with the federal government over immigration issues involving the Mexican border. But it has broader implications because four other states — Alabama, Georgia, Kansas and Tennessee — have similar requirements, and 12 other states are contemplating such legislation.

Are you in favor of this law requiring citizenship proof or not? Feel free to express your opinion regarding this issue!

Source: Associated Press, Fox News

Image: The Christian Science Monitor

Five-year-old Boy Fatally Shoots 2-year-old Sister

Five-year-old Boy Fatally Shoots 2-year-old SisterA Kentucky mother stepped outside of her home just for a few minutes, but it was long enough for her 5-year-old son to accidentally shoot and kill his 2-year-old sister with the .22-caliber rifle he got for his birthday, state officials said.

‘Guns at an early age’

The shooting in southern Kentucky has been ruled an accident, Kentucky State Police Trooper Billy Gregory said. Young children in the area are often introduced to guns at an early age, Gregory said.

On Wednesday, state police were still investigating toddler Caroline Sparks’ death, CNN affiliate WLEX reported. Her family kept the Crickett rifle in what they considered to be a safe spot, Cumberland County Coroner Gary White told the CNN affiliate. The boy was playing with it Tuesday when it accidentally went off and killed his sister, White said.


‘Rifle models for kids’

The Crickett website features three .22-caliber rifle models for kids, with shoulder stock colors ranging from pink to red, white and blue swirls. “My first rifle” is the company’s slogan. Family members Wednesday described the shooting as an accident.

Caroline Sparks’ death comes after two other incidents in recent months involving young children shooting others. In early April, a 4-year-old boy in Tennessee shot and killed a 48-year-old woman, and just days later, 6-year-old Brandon Holt was killed in New Jersey after being shot in the head by his 4-year-old playmate.

Were the parents at fault in the fatal shooting accident? How young is “too young” when it comes to handling firearms?

Source: Leigh Remizowski, CNN

Image: RT