Ikea Recalls Meatballs From Czech Republic After Horse Meat Is Found

Ikea Recalls Meatballs From Czech Republic After Horse Meat Is FoundIkea has withdrawn meatballs from sale in 14 European countries after tests in the Czech Republic found traces of horsemeat in a batch made in Sweden. Meatballs from the same batch had been sold in many states, including the UK, France and Portugal, the retailer said.

‘Halting all sales of meatballs’

Ikea’s announcement on Monday came after the Czech State Veterinary Administration said horsemeat had been found in 1kg (2.2lb) packs of meatballs manufactured in Sweden and shipped to the Czech Republic for sale in Ikea stores there.

In a posting on its Swedish Facebook page, Ikea first confirmed it was halting all sales of meatballs at its stores in the country. Later, the company announced that meatballs from the affected batch of meatballs had also been sent to Ikea stores in Slovakia, Hungary, France, the UK, Portugal, the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cyprus and the Republic of Ireland.

‘Traces of horsemeat’

Ikea insisted that it had not found any horsemeat during in-house tests on its own range of food products, carried out two weeks ago, but said new tests would now be carried out.

Also on Monday, the Spanish agriculture ministry announced that traces of horsemeat had been found in beef pasta meals produced by brands owned by Nestle. A statement on the Swiss company’s website said it was withdrawing six “La Cocinera” products and one “Buitoni” product from shops in Spain, and that it had halted all deliveries from the meat supplier, Servocar.

Nestle said testing continued across its products, a week after it announced that it was withdrawing two types of beef pasta meals from supermarkets in Italy and Spain which had been supplied by a company in Germany, H J Schypke.

How widespread do you think is this horsemeat affair in Europe? Would you eat “beef” products that contain horsemeat?

Source: BBC News

Image: NPR

Romania Debuts Record-Breaking Bridal Gown

As the latest record-we-didn’t-know-you could-break, a Romanian design house debuted the longest bridal train known to man.

The Andree Salon, a Bucharest fashion label, hired 10 seamstresses to toil away on the Guinness World Record-breaking dress for 100 days. The imported material alone, including French lace and Italian taffeta, cost around $7,300. That’s not including labor and the dramatic floating runway show.

On Tuesday, a model wearing the dress was hoisted into the air outside Bucharest’s Palace of the Parliament, for all the world to see- in particular- The Netherlands. The Dutch country previously held the longest train record (it wasn’t even a mile, ha!). The victory was particularly sweet, in light of a feud sparked between the two countries, after Dutch leaders campaigned to keep Romania out of the European Union’s visa-free travel zone.


“If the Netherlands does not allow us into Europe, we’ll take them out of the world records book,” Alin Caraman, an organizer of the train’s big debut, told the Associated Press.

And they did, with the near-maniacal passion of a bridezilla and a 1.85-mile train, roughly the width of Manhattan. If a real bride were to walk down the aisle in that dress, she’d need a venue the size of four football fields and an entire NFL team of bridesmaids to hold the train. Don’t get any funny ideas, Kardashians.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Carbonated TV