Rupert Murdoch’s Take On Scientology

With the recent splash of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes’ divorce over the weekend, Rupert Murdoch, News Corp. chief executive and media mogul, publicized his reactions on the news via Twitter. And indeed, his tweets included remarks about Scientology that could possibly create waves in the media world.

Murdoch tweeted: “Scientology back in news. Very weird cult, but big, big money involved with Tom Cruise either number two or three in [hierarchy].”

Murdoch, who owns Fox News, Wall Street Journal and New York Post, tweeted another “cult” comment right after the first one: ”Watch Katie Holmes and Scientology story develop. Something creepy, maybe even evil, about these people.”

According to the Los Angeles Times, Cruise is often linked with Viacom’s Paramount Pictures, and has done movies for 20th Century Fox — which is owned by News Corporation. He is also ”known for being prickly about being challenged about his involvement with Scientology.”


Still, Murdoch stands by the lines he tweeted: ”Since Scientology tweet hundreds of attacks, expect they will increase and get worse and maybe threatening. Still stick to my story.” And when a user asked about Murdoch’s take on Mormonism, he replied: ”Mormonism a mystery to me, but Mormons certainly not evil.”

Scientology was created by L. Ron Hubbard in 1952. It is a body of beliefs and related practices to his self-help system, Dianetics. Scientology’s teaching involves the principle that humans are simply immortal beings who have forgotten their true nature. It uses auditing, a method of spiritual rehabilitation where a person aims to consciously relive painful or traumatic experiences in their past in order to liberate themselves of their negative effects. Scientology is a tax-exempt religion in the United States.

What do you know about Scientology? What do you think gave Murdoch the impression that Scientologists are “creepy” and evil”? Do you share the same opinion with him or not?

Image: Innovations In Newspapers

NBA Lockout Ends, Some Fans Disgruntled

Although NBA players and owners reached a tentative agreement late Saturday night after a 15-hour meeting that ends a 149-day lockout, some fans’ patience has been pushed too far to feel celebratory.

A fan who attended every New York Knicks opener since 1959 told The New York Post that he’s skipping this year’s Christmas Day opener in favor of a cruise to the Bahamas, saying the lockout is “ridiculous… They make so much money. It’s childish.” Workers at the TD Garden that depend on Celtics games in order to pay bills, told The Boston Globe they felt bitter after watching multimillionaires complain about their contract.

Owners and players reached a tentative new labor deal early Saturday; one they expect will be ratified in time to start the season with a December 25 triple-header.

It comes at a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars for both sides, on top of the fans and jobs that were lost during the stalemate. And it leaves the NBA with its second shortened season, with the hope of getting in 66 games instead of a full 82-game schedule.

Owners relented slightly on their previous insistence that players receive no more than 50 percent of basketball-related income after they were guaranteed 57 percent in the old collective bargaining agreement. The target is still a 50-50 split, but with a band from 49 percent to 51 percent that gives the players a better chance of reaching the highest limit than previously proposed. To be sure, not all basketball fans are un-welcoming to news of the abbreviated season.

 

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