NC Basketball Prospect Collapses And Dies During Game

NC Basketball Prospect Collapses And Dies During GameTragedy struck North Carolina on Tuesday night when Josh Level, one of the state’s most promising young basketball players, collapsed during a game and died shortly thereafter from unknown circumstances.

‘One of the top prospects’

As reported by The Greensboro News & Record and Greensville Fox affiliate WGHP, Level, a 17-year-old star for Greensboro (N.C.) New Garden Friends School, collapsed during a timeout break in the third quarter of a game at Winston-Salem (N.C.) Quality Education Academy. While a nurse on hand immediately rushed to Level’s aid, he was never resuscitated and was pronounced dead shortly after being transported to nearby Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Level was considered one of the top prospects in North Carolina’s Class of 2014. The junior had already received scholarship offers from the likes of Oklahoma State and Charlotte and was also being recruited by Wake Forest and North Carolina State, among other top programs. Scouts Focus National Scouting Director Joe Davis told Prep Rally that Level was easily one of the top 10 players to compete at his Greensboro Invitational event in 2012.


‘Passed far too soon’

In an earlier interview with the Wolfpacker’s Jacey Zembal, Level said that he was motivated by his desire to prove those who had overlooked him wrong. Sadly, Level will never get that chance now, having passed far too soon while playing the game he loved.

What do you think was Josh Level’s cause of death? In line of this very promising player’s sudden death, should basketball teams implement a stricter health screening method for all its prospects?

Source: Cameron Smith, Yahoo Sports

Image: The Big Lead

Annular Eclipse Coming Up This Weekend

We Earthlings have already been treated to nice meteor showers as well as a magnificent supermoon, and this weekend brings an annular solar eclipse.

That’s not even the best treat: Venus will be ambling between Earth and the sun in a rare (though non-earth-shattering) planetary alignment. Sure, the event might look like a black pimple floating across the face of the sun, but this celestial rarity once guided adventurous astronomers in their quest to determine the size of the solar system and yielded the first-ever global scientific collaboration. Don’t blink—Venus doesn’t cross our path again until December 2117.


A solar eclipse happens this Sunday, except for the Eastern seaboard (sorry). It’s an “annular” eclipse rather than a total one, which means the sun’s edges peek out from behind the moon, creating the illusion of a ring of fire. (The word “annular” comes from the Latin word for ring.) The lower 48 states will have to wait until Aug. 17, 2017, for a total shutout. This weekend’s eclipse

begins at dawn in southern China. It then sweeps across the Pacific Ocean, passing south of Alaska, and makes landfall on the Pacific coast near the California-Oregon border. It ends near Lubbock, Texas, at sunset. Partial phases of this eclipse will be visible over most of western North America. (May 9, Space.com)

Those of you in the annular path should head to higher ground (avoiding clouds and light pollution) and put solar filters either over your eyes or on your equipment. Thirty-three national parks will be hosting solar gatherings. Lucky Coloradans get to hang out for free at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Folsom stadium, starting 5:30 p.m. local time, thanks to the Fiske Planetarium.

Designer sunglasses don’t cut it. At this late date, check telescope stores or call your local planetarium. No. 14 welder’s glass, carried in specialty welding stores, works too.

Will you be watching for the annular eclipse this weekend? Tell us of your previous sightings!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: ABC News