Blackberry Maker RIM Buckles Up Despite $125M Loss

Blackberry-maker Research in Motion (RIM) has said it plans to refocus its business back onto corporate customers.

The Canadian company made a net loss for the three months to 3 March of $125m (£78m), compared with a profit of $934m a year earlier. It has lost ground as its traditional corporate customers have switched staff to iPhones or Android smartphones. RIM also announced the resignation of former co-chief executive Jim Balsillie. Chief technology officer David Yacht will also be standing down.

For the full financial year, the RIM made a net profit of $1.2bn, down from $3.4bn in the previous year. The results were worse than analysts had expected and shares in the company fell as much as 9% in after-hours trading in New York. They have fallen by 80% over the past year. RIM has struggled to keep up with rivals in the smartphone market, such as Apple’s iPhone and handsets running on Google’s Android operating system. It has also struggled to gain a foothold in the tablet market.


Newly-appointed chief executive Thorsten Heins said the company would now focus on its traditional core market of corporate customers rather than on individual consumers as part of a strategy to turn the business around: “We believe that Blackberry cannot succeed if we tried to be everybody’s darling and all things to all people. Therefore, we plan to build on our strength.”

Analysts said the company could continue to struggle until it became clear whether this turnaround plan would succeed.

Source: BBC News

Image: Pocket-lint

Apple and Samsung Push HTC Sales to Bottom

Once high-flying Android manufacturer HTC reported weak fourth quarter results and forecast an even tougher first quarter as competition from Apple and Samsung squeezed the Taiwanese smartphone maker.

In the first quarter, HTC said it was expecting revenue of between 65 billion and 70 billion Taiwanese dollars or $2.20-2.37 billion, which could amount to as much as a 36 percent drop from the previous quarter. Analysts had expected HTC to generate $89.64 billion or $3.04 billion in revenue this quarter. HTC said the disappointing forecast stemmed from its transition to newer products, which will be previewed at the Mobile World Congress. It called the slow down “temporary.”


The company has been talking about putting out fewer phones and rallying around more “hero” devices. HTC rode the wave behind Android and enjoyed a lot of growth along with the rest of the smartphone market. But as Samsung began cranking on Android phones, Apple exploded last quarter with an impressive showing on iPhone sales and low-end Chinese makers ZTE and Huawei came on strong, it has left HTC with less room to stand out.

HTC will hope that the HTC Ville, a 4.3-inch inch Android 4.0 device, and other upcoming devices can help lead a turnaround. But it’s unclear what will provide the real spark. The HTC Rezound was one of the top Android devices this fall from HTC but it got overshadowed by the Galaxy Nexus from Samsung and the Motorola Razr.

Source: Digg

Image: Tech Radar