Daily Soft Drink Increases Diabetes Risk

Daily Soft Drink Increases Diabetes RiskDrinking one or more cans of sugary soft drinks a day is linked to an increased risk of diabetes in later life, a study suggests. A can a day raises the relative risk of Type-2 diabetes by about a fifth, compared with one can a month or under, say European scientists. The in the journal Diabetologia mirrors previous US findings.

‘Calorific’

A diabetes charity recommends limiting sugary foods and drinks as they are calorific and can cause weight gain. The latest research was carried out in the UK, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden, France and the Netherlands. Some 350,000 individuals were questioned about their diet, as part of a large European study looking at links between diet and cancer.

“The consumption of sugar sweetened soft drinks increases your risk of diabetes – so for every can of soft drinks that you drink per day, the risk is higher,” lead researcher Dora Romaguera from Imperial College London told BBC News.


‘Deleterious effect on health’

She called for clearer public health information on the effects of sugary soft drinks: ”Given the increase in sweet beverage consumption in Europe, clear messages on its deleterious effect on health should be given to the population,” Dr Romaguera and colleagues conclude in their research paper.

Gavin Partington, director general of the drinks industry body the British Soft Drinks Association said: “Soft drinks are safe to consume but, like all other food and drink, should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.”

How many glasses or cans of soft drinks do you consume in a day? Do you think you are in danger of having diabetes later on in life?

Source: BBC News

Image: The West Australian

Chocolate’s Sweet Benefits For Heart And Brain

Eating high levels of chocolate could reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke, according to a review of previous research.

Data from 114,009 patients suggested risk was cut by about a third, according to a study published on the BMJ . But the researchers warned that excessive consumption would result in other illnesses. The British Heart Foundation said there were better ways to protect the heart.

The analysis, conducted by scientists at the University of Cambridge, compared the risk to the brain and heart in groups of people who reported eating low levels of chocolate, fewer than two bars per week, with those eating high levels – more than two bars per week. It showed that the “highest levels of chocolate consumption were associated with a 37% reduction in cardiovascular disease and a 29% reduction in stroke compared with the lowest levels.”


One of the researchers, Dr Oscar Franco, said chocolate was known to decrease blood pressure. He told the BBC the findings were “promising”, but needed further research to confirm any protective effect.

The study also warns that chocolate can lead to weight gain and Type 2 diabetes. It suggested that chocolate could one day be used to protect from heart problems and stroke – if the sugar and fat content of chocolate bars was reduced. Dr Franco added: “The advice if you don’t eat chocolate is not to start eating chocolate.” For those who did eat chocolate, he recommended that they should “avoid binge-eating” and eat “small amounts [of chocolate] on a regular basis.”

Do you like chocolates? How much chocolate do you eat on the weekly average? Tell us if you agree that regular intake of small amounts of chocolate can protect the brain and the heart!

Source: BBC News

Image: Big Think