Health Risk Of Drying Clothes Indoors

Health Risk Of Drying Clothes IndoorsDrying laundry in the home poses a health risk to those prone to asthma, hay fever and other allergies, according to new research.  A study carried out by the Mackintosh School of Architecture found that many homes had too much moisture indoors. Up to a third of this moisture was attributed to drying laundry.

‘Dedicated drying areas’

The researchers have called on housebuilders to build dedicated drying areas into new housing to address the health concerns. A study of 100 homes by the Mackintosh Environmental Architecture Research Unit in Glasgow found 87% dried their washing indoors in colder weather. Researcher Rosalie Menon said people were not aware how much moisture this added to the air.

She said: “Going into people’s homes, we found they were drying washing in their living rooms, in their bedrooms. Some were literally decorating the house with it, but from just one load of washing two litres of water will be emitted.”


‘Lung infections’

A total of 75% of households, which were of mixed styles, had moisture levels which could lead to dust mite growth. There was also a strong association between drying laundry and mould spores. A particular mould spore known to cause lung infections in people with weakened immune systems was found in 25% of the homes sampled.

The research, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, was the first to track the implications of drying laundry passively inside the home. All of the types of housing surveyed had a lack of suitable spaces for drying clothes.

Do you often dry your laundry indoors? Tell us how this has affected your health in some way!

Source: BBC News

Image: The Independent

Gases From Flatulent Dinosaurs May Have ‘Warmed The Earth’

Giant dinosaurs could have warmed the planet with their flatulence, say researchers.

British scientists have calculated the methane output of sauropods, including the species known as Brontosaurus. By scaling up the digestive wind of cows, they estimate that the population of dinosaurs – as a whole – produced 520 million tonnes of gas annually. They suggest the gas could have been a key factor in the warm climate 150 million years ago.

David Wilkinson from Liverpool John Moore’s University, and colleagues from the University of London and the University of Glasgow published their results in the journal Current Biology. Sauropods, such as Apatosaurus louise (formerly known as Brontosaurus), were super-sized land animals that grazed on vegetation during the Mesozoic Era. For Dr Wilkinson, it was not the giants that were of interest but the microscopic organisms living inside them.


Methane is known as a “greenhouse gas” that absorbs infrared radiation from the sun, trapping it in the Earth’s atmosphere and leading to increased temperatures.

Previous studies have suggested that the Earth was up to 10C (18F) warmer in the Mesozoic Era. With the knowledge that livestock emissions currently contribute a significant part to global methane levels, the researchers used existing data to estimate how sauropods could have affected the climate. Their calculations considered the dinosaurs’ estimated total population and used a scale that links biomass to methane output for cattle.

Current methane emissions amount to around 500 million tonnes a year from a combination of natural sources, such as wild animals, and human activities including dairy and meat production. Expressing his surprise at the comparative figures, Dr Wilkinson added that dinosaurs were not the sole producers of methane at the time.

Do you think that the dinosaurs’ flatulence created that much effect in the Earth’s climate back then? Tell us what you think!

Source: Digg Science

Image: Mirror News