What Have We Become?

What Have We BecomeIn the wake of the senseless shooting of Australian baseball player Christopher Lane, people are now forced to contemplate this generation’s capacity for violence.

‘Violent generation’

The three Oklahoma teenagers who killed Lane admitted to the police that they shot Lane out of boredom. The darkness of the soul of those cold-blooded youngsters that killed a promising athlete is indeed unfathomable. What have we now become — a violent generation?

Right now, we live in a world that worships violence. Just take a look at the most popular movies, the scream-your-lungs-out songs, and even the most “exciting” video games that we play. The more we expose ourselves and our kids to these sources of violence, the more they become insensitive to the value of life, and the easier they find it to pull the trigger and end a person’s life.

‘Values’

Where are the parents of those three Oklahoma teenagers charged with the murder of Christopher Lane? Where are the parents of other lost children who spend most of their waking time in front of violent video games and fantasize about shooting someone in real life instead of just inside the realms of a game? What sort of values are ingrained in the minds and heart of these kids? Or most importantly, are there still ANY values being taught to them?

The parents of today’s generation put so much responsibility of child rearing on the shoulders of the government, babysitters, and teachers that most of them fail to perform their own responsibilities well. We have become lost in being so liberated that we have forgotten to teach our kids to fear God and bestow love upon mankind. Many have already turned their back on God and lost track of what is right and what is wrong. Now, look where this so-called “liberation” has gotten us.

Can all the violence and hate still be undone? Do you still teach your kids about morality and fear in God? Are we at fault for all the senseless crimes that abound?

Image: The Christian Science Monitor

Economist Dishes Out Advice On Understanding China

Economist Dishes Out Advice On Understanding ChinaChina’s growing importance on the world stage means that the West needs to start speaking its language, says economist Martin Jacques. The reluctance of the educational system – public and private – to grasp the Chinese nettle is a metaphor for a much wider problem: our ignorance about China and our failure to appreciate just how much it will change the world and transform our lives.

‘Through a western prism’

With unerring regularity, our predictions about China have proved mistaken. Take its economy. In 1980 it was one-20th of the size of the US, today it is half the size and closing rapidly. Why have we managed to get China so wrong? The reason is hardly rocket science. We insist on viewing it through a western prism.


‘Civilization-state’

We have to understand China as it is and as it has been, not project our own history, culture, institutions and values onto it. We assume that the nation-state, that long-standing and remarkably influential European invention, is more or less universal. True, China has called itself a nation-state for about a century. But 100 years is a mere pin-prick for a country that dates back over two millennia. Modern China emerged in 221. And for more than 2,000 years, it was not a nation-state but a civilisation-state. In essence it still is. Civilisation is what defines China.

China is huge, a continent in its own right as well being home to 1.3bn people, one-fifth of the human race. Although we tend to see China as highly centralised, it would be impossible to run a country of such size and immense diversity from Beijing. Its provincial governments have enjoyed great power, with the largest having far more authority than the great majority of the world’s nation-states.

The idea of China as a civilisation-state is the key to many other aspects of China. If we persist with our present mindset, then don’t be surprised if we continue getting China hopelessly wrong.

Do you feel the need to learn the Chinese language? Tell us in what way have you also misunderstood China!

Source: BBC News

Image: Asia Society