Rihanna: Musical Reunion With Chris Brown is ‘Innocent’

Pop star Rihanna called her recent musical collaboration with ex-boyfriend Chris Brown “innocent,” after critics and fans split on the duo working together three years after Brown assaulted the pop star.

“We did two records, one for my fans and one for his fans, and that way our fans can come together. There shouldn’t be a divide, you know, it’s music and it’s innocent,” Rihanna told Ryan Seacrest on his syndicated morning radio show on Thursday.

Rihanna provided vocals on a remix of Brown’s new dance song “Turn Up The Music” while Brown lent his voice to Rihanna’s sexually-charged “Birthday Cake.” Both tracks were released last month after the Grammy awards on February 12.


“I thought about rappers and I’ve done that so many times, and the hottest R&B artist out right now is Chris Brown, so I wanted him on the track,” she added.

Brown nearly derailed his career three years ago on the night before the Grammys, after he was arrested for beating up his then-girlfriend, Rihanna. Since that time he has tried to rehabilitate himself in the eyes of fans with mixed results.

The musical reunion of Rihanna and Brown had social networks abuzz as fans split on the pair working together with some making cynical comments, others calling it a publicity stunt and many embracing the new songs.

 

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Crushable

Penn Professor Demonstrates Flying Robots in TED

Vijay Kumar, an engineering professor at the University of Pennsylvania, showed the more than 1,300 attendees at last week’s TED conference several videos in which fleets of tiny flying robots performed a series of intricate manuevers, working together on tasks without colliding or interfering with each others’ flightworthiness.

It seemed that, at least for some in the audience, a bridge had been crossed into a new era of technology, one that could change the way we think about robots and their application to such fields as construction, shipping and responding to emergencies.

Kumar’s devices (he calls them “Autonomous Agile Aerial Robots”) cooperated on building simple structures and showed they were capable of entering a building for the first time and quickly constructing a map that would allow for assessment and response to a structural collapse or fire. The robots are capable of learning trajectories and maneuvers that can enable them to literally fly through hoops — and other confined spaces.


When the robots are formed into a flotilla, they calculate (a hundred times a second) and maintain a safe distance between them. He showed a video of 20 robots flying in a variety of formations — and moving through obstacles — inches from each other without interfering with the stability of their neighbors.

TED began in the 1980s with the intention of focusing on “Technology, entertainment and design,” and its conferences typically are sold out, attracting an audience of high achievers willing to pay $7,500 to attend. TED, a nonprofit, makes many of the talks freely available on its site.

Source: CNN

Image: Wamda