Couple Dies On Same Day After 65 Years Of Marriage

Couple Dies On Same Day After 65 Years Of MarriageThey met in elementary school, began a romance during World War II and married not long afterward. They had a lifelong devotion to each other as husband and wife that lasted nearly 66 years — and one day earlier this month they died, just 11 hours apart.

‘They got to go together’

Their children call it their “final act of love.” Harold Knapke, 91, and his wife, Ruth, 89, died August 11 at the Versailles Health Care Center nursing home in Russia, Ohio, spokeswoman Teresa Pohlmon said. Their children said they were nine days short of their 66th wedding anniversary.

“It’s consoling to us that they went together,” said their daughter, Margaret Knapke. “On one hand it’s difficult to lose both parents at once when you didn’t see it coming … but it’s very consoling that they got to go together.”


‘There is a love that lasts’

According to Margaret, her father’s health had been deteriorating more quickly than her mother’s for about a year. Margaret said Ruth contracted a rare infection shortly before her death and it was clear she was not going to recover. When Margaret and her siblings told her father the news, she recalled, he took it calmly but they saw a “shift” in him. Just a few days later, Margaret and one of her sisters noticed that their father appeared to be very ill, she said.

“My sister said, ‘It’s almost like he’s trying to catch up to Mom.'”

Three days later, Harold died, at 7:30 a.m.  Ruth Knapke died that night, at 6:30 p.m. The two were laid to rest together in a joint funeral.

“Mom and Dad were ordinary people,” Reindl said. “I guess if people can learn from our story it’s that there is love that lasts, and that’s a good thing.”

Do you believe in everlasting love? Tell us if this story has touched your heart!

Source: Allie Malloy | CNN

Image: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Computer Mouse Creator Douglas Engelbart Dies At 88

Computer Mouse Creator Douglas Engelbart Dies At 88Douglas Engelbart, whose invention of the mouse transformed the way people interact with computers, died Tuesday night at his home in Atherton, California, SRI International — the research institute where he once worked –said in a statement. He was 88.

‘A vision’

Decades ago, Engelbart came up with the idea we now know as a mouse. His first prototype, which featured a carved out wooden block, wheels and a tiny red button, looks quite different from the sleek plastic designs now seen in homes and offices around the world.

A radar technician during World War II, Engelbart worked at the Stanford Research Institute during the 1960s. It was there that a vision of people sitting in front of a video screen, interacting with a computer, came to him.


‘Global scale’

Engelbart invented and patented what he called the “x-y position indicator,” receiving a $10,000 check for the invention. He told CNN he couldn’t recall who on his team had decided to call it a mouse. Later, he went on to found the Doug Engelbart Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to boosting the collective ability to solve complex, urgent problems on a global scale.

In addition to the computer mouse, Engelbart’s work at SRI from 1957 to 1977 helped develop tech innovations such as display editing, online processing, linking and in-file object addressing, use of multiple windows, hypermedia, and context-sensitive help, the institute said.

Engelbart is survived by his wife and four children.

Can you imagine a modern world without the computer mouse? Which technological innovation do you find the most interesting?

Source: CNN

Image: Nerds in the Know