Chinese Tourist Defaces Ancient Egyptian Temple

Chinese Tourist Defaces Ancient Egyptian TempleParents of a 15-year-old Chinese tourist have apologized after the teenager defaced a stone sculpture in an ancient Egyptian temple with graffiti. The act drew ire in both Egypt and China — generating a massive online backlash amongst China’s unforgiving netizens.

‘Embarrassed’

The vandal carved ‘Ding Jinhao was here’ in Chinese in the 3,500 year old Luxor Temple. This was photographed by an embarrassed Chinese traveler and shared on weibo, China’s micro-blogging site on May 24.

“The saddest moment in Egypt. I’m so embarrassed that I want to hide myself. I said to the Egyptian tour guide,’I’m really sorry,'” that traveler wrote on the original weibo post. “We want to wipe off the marking with a towel. But we can’t use water since it is a 3,500 relic.”


‘Learned his lesson’

It didn’t take long — actually, just a day — before outraged netizens tracked down Ding in Nanjing. Slammed online and exposed further in the mainstream, Ding’s parents quickly contacted media outlets.

“We want to apologize to the Egyptian people and to people who have paid attention to this case across China,” Ding’s mother said in a China Daily report.

Ding’s parents said they shouldered the responsibility of what their son did, adding he had learned his lesson.

The original weibo post was re-tweeted almost 90,000 times, received over 18,000 comments and was widely distributed across local media. In a state-run Xinhua media report, one of the agency’s photographers said local Egyptian staff had worked to try and clean the sculpture. While there was some improvement, the graffiti could not be totally removed.

Should Ding himself be punished for vandalizing the ancient Egyptian temple? Feel free to share your opinion regarding this issue.

Source: Hiufu Wong, CNN

Image: China Daily

S. Korea Reaches Out to N. Korea in Sympathy

The South Korean government expressed its sympathy to the people of North Korea following the death of Kim Jong Il, South Korea’s unification minister said Tuesday.

In a televised press conference, Unification Minister Yu Woo-ik also said Seoul will not send a government delegation to North Korea. However, the South will allow bereaved family members of the late South Korean President Kim Dae-jung and the late Hyundai Group Chairman Chung Mong-hun to visit the North in return for a visit by North Korean delegates to the funerals of the two South Korean figures.

In addition, the South Korean government asked church groups to refrain from lighting Christmas trees near the demilitarized zone between the two countries due to the North’s mourning period. The Christmas trees have been deemed a symbol of psychological warfare, and North Korea threatened in the past to retaliate if the South lights the trees.

Meanwhile, Kim Jong Un, the son and successor of the recently deceased North Korean leader, viewed his father’s body in Pyongyang on Tuesday, state-run media said, as the world watched for clues on how the leadership transition will play out in the insular dictatorship. Kim enjoyed a cult-like status in the nation, with millions schooled to accept him as a divine and benevolent father figure.

Several of North Korea’s neighbors, including Japan, the Philippines and leading ally China, offered condolences to the North Korean people on Kim’s death. Chinese President Hu Jintao visited the North Korean embassy in Beijing Tuesday to offer condolences, according to the Chinese state-run news agency Xinhua. The deceased leader’s body will remain for a week at the Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang, where his father is also interred. Memorial services will follow on December 28 and 29.

 

Source: CNN.com

Image: EuroNews.net